Colts to Contemplate Utilizing More of a No-Huddle, Uptempo Offense

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Oct 2, 2016; London, United Kingdom; Indianapolis Colts quarterback Andrew Luck (12) huddles with teammates Erik Swoope (86), Jack Doyle (84), Dwayne Allen (83), Jack Mewhort (75) and Joe Haeg (73) during game 15 of the NFL International Series against the Jacksonville Jaguars at Wembley Stadium. The Jaguars defeated the Colts 30-27. Mandatory Credit: Kirby Lee-USA TODAY Sports
Oct 2, 2016; London, United Kingdom; Indianapolis Colts quarterback Andrew Luck (12) huddles with teammates Erik Swoope (86), Jack Doyle (84), Dwayne Allen (83), Jack Mewhort (75) and Joe Haeg (73) during game 15 of the NFL International Series against the Jacksonville Jaguars at Wembley Stadium. The Jaguars defeated the Colts 30-27. Mandatory Credit: Kirby Lee-USA TODAY Sports /
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Having caught fire in the 4th quarter by running a no-huddle, uptempo offense, Andrew Luck and the Colts could look to speed up opposing defenses more often throughout the course of games going forward.

The Indianapolis Colts are contemplating utilizing more of a no-huddle, uptempo offense after the offense scored just 6 points in the first three quarters against the Jacksonville Jaguars on Sunday–only to score 21 points in the 4th quarter after running at a quicker pace.

Starting quarterback Andrew Luck seems to play much better and efficient, when the Colts switch to more of a no huddle offense–perhaps because he can do less thinking and simply play football at a high level:

However, head coach Chuck Pagano said on Monday that the reason the team hasn’t utilized the no-huddle, uptempo offense more is because of personnel packages, meaning that the Colts don’t want to be stuck with one personnel grouping for an entire offensive drive–limiting their versatility:

"Oct 2, 2016; London, United Kingdom; Indianapolis Colts head coach Chuck Pagano before game 15 of the NFL International Series against the Jacksonville Jaguars at Wembley Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Kirby Lee-USA TODAY Sports“Great question,” answered Pagano on the Colts potentially utilizing more of a no-huddle offense going forward. “It’s something we’ll continue to have dialogue about with and talk about it as a staff.”“There’s things from a game plan perspective that you look at where you go no-huddle and you get a group on the field, and you basically have to keep them on the field. If you want to utilize both tight ends at one point–if you want to go one tight end, three wideouts, you know and stay that way. If you get a (running) back in there, and you go no huddle, you basically have to keep him in there based on the pace that you’re going to go. So those are some of the things that go into that.”“Then just trying to get into a rhythm early, try to help some young guys out. No excuses, but we’ve got three young guys starting up front (along the offensive line). All of those things, but definitely something we’ll talk about.”"

As much as it forces the Colts to stick with one personnel package, it also keeps the opposing defense limited to the same dilemma. For a Colts offensive line that has struggled in pass protection, it also takes some of the legs out of opposing pass rushers and leaves defenses gassed in general. If given that trade-off, the advantage would still clearly go to the Colts offense–who get to act while conversely forcing the defense to react on their toes at a torrid pace.

Of course, Colts fans aren’t the only one who noticed that the offense seems to fare much better when running the no-huddle offense, as legendary franchise wide receiver Reggie Wayne recently said the same thing:

Of course, another drawback of an uptempo, no huddle offense is that it allows your own defense less time to rest on the sidelines. However, the Colts actually led the Jaguars offense in time of possession in the first half 18:33 to 11:27, yet the team trailed 17-6–showing how potentially meaningless that stat very well may be to a team’s success.

The bottom line is that the Colts weren’t going to beat anyone scoring 6 points through 3 quarters, so at least going to an uptempo pace allows Luck and the offense a greater opportunity to score points while ultimately providing a better chance of winning football games–especially when the alternative is a lifeless offense.

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